Archive for the ‘James Bond’ Category

Live and Let Die (1973)

Posted: August 11, 2019 in horror, James Bond
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Bond is back, but Connery has disappeared again, leaving 007 behind to make highbrow fair like, er, Zardoz. After dallying briefly with the idea of Burt Reynolds or Adam West, the producers insisted on a British actor, and in the end the man taking up the 00 licence was the Saint himself, Roger Moore.

It’s easy to make fun of Moore, easy to deride him as an actor and a Bond, but he made several of the most enjoyable Bond films, including this one.

Is it From Russia with Love or OHMSS? Not remotely! Is it better than many of the films that preceded it? Indubitably. Live and Let Die follows in the footsteps of Diamonds as a lighter Bond film, it also, in line with several Bond films, takes inspiration from other genres. Some might decry Bond becoming a follower rather than a leader but, for the most part it’s what’s kept the franchise going for as long as it has, it’s ability to reinvent itself.

Here the influence is Blaxploitation, and while some of the attendant lingo might be more than a little wince inducing now (honky, spade, pimpmobile) taken in the context of its time you could argue this is quite radical. Yes the majority of the black actors are the villains, but there are a decent number of them, and some are the franchise’s most iconic villains. Obviously I’m coming at this from the angle of a white middle class male so feel free to disagree.

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After hiding an Italian agent in his wardrove when M and Moneypenny come around, Bond’s off to New York to investigate the deaths of three British agents. He quickly becomes the target for gangsters led by Mr Big, who seems to be in cahoots with Dr Kananga, the dictator of San Monique (what can be the shocking connection between the two men???). He also comes across a woman named Solitaire who has an almost supernatural ability to predict the future.

I’m a fan of Roger Moore, but even I’d concede he should have quit the franchise long before he did. Here though he’s a joy to watch, effortless and charming, with a hint of danger and, for a guy who’s actually born before Connery, someone who looks in better shape than Sean did in Diamonds.

Roger was in on the joke but, unlike Connery, he plays it straight and leans into the ridiculousness of Bond. He doesn’t have the predatory physique of Connery, but similarly the vulnerability of Lazenby is nowhere to be seen. Moore’s Bond is brimming with self-belief, an assured confidence that sees him stare death in the face with a smile, most of the time. That isn’t to say he doesn’t face his mortality. When he’s on the verge of losing a finger to Tee-Hee, or on that island surrounded by crocs he does have the decency to look slightly worried.

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He’s not a nice guy though, from his assertion to Rosie that he wouldn’t have killed her before they made love, to telling Solitaire she’s safe now even though he’s planning to use her as bait. And on the subject of Solitaire, loading the deck with lovers cards is pretty far from 007’s finest hour. The only (slight) get out is that he’d already picked a genuine Lovers card from the deck, as did Solitaire, so you could argue it was always destined to be, or maybe the cards were picking up on Bond’s future deception? Time paradoxes aren’t usual for Bond, but then again this isn’t a usual Bond film. (but I’ll get to that).

Does Moore always convince in a fist fight? Maybe not, but he looks the part, and how iconic does he look in dressed in black touting a big fuck off .44 magnum at the end?

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As Mr Big/Kananga (sorry!) Yaphet Kotto is excellent. Urbane and intelligent, yet capable of flashes of anger and more than happy to do his own dirty work as required. Yes, the Mr Big prosthetics are a trifle silly, as is the fact 007 doesn’t cotton on, but he’s a top draw villain for me, shame about how he dies though. “Names is for tombstones, baby” is a wonderful line though.

As Tee Hee Julius Harris is clearly having fun. He’s a neat henchman with his pincer for an arm (and nice to see a villain’s oddity get a backstory!) to his affable nature, he genuinely always looks pleased to see Bond even though he’s about to try and kill him.

Neither of these men are the best villain however, which is kinda insane given how good they are, but they’re not the late Geoffrey Holder, they’re no Baron Samedi. I mean he isn’t in it that much, but he dominates the screen, he’s a giant of a man yet walks with the grace of a dancer (hardly surprising given Holder was a dancer and choreographer) and his deep baritone voice is a joy to behold (and by all accounts he was a lovely man in real life). All this is before he’s done up in his Baron Samedi get up, and this just propels him to another level. His fight with Bond is short but memorable, especially his demise in a coffin full of snakes.

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Best of all he’s a henchman like few others. A henchman who isn’t killed. Or is he? Were the snakes in that coffin non-venomous? Was he immune? Or is he really Baron Samedi, the man who cannot die? I mean he’s clearly still alive at the end, sitting on the front of the train uttering a wonderfully malevolent laugh, which doesn’t strike me as something a regular person would do.

And this is the thing about LALD. It’s the closest Bond’s ever got to an out and out horror film. I mean, either Solitaire is incredibly lucky, or she really can predict the future, which implies the supernatural is real, and if Samedi really did come back from the dead…

Whichever way you look at it this is a film with a unique and iconic production design, and certainly the most skulls we’ve ever seen in a Bond movie (and clearly was an influence on Spectre’s pre-title sequence).

2012_CSK_04431_0008_001(live_and_let_die).jpgAs Solitaire it has to be said that Jane Seymour is gorgeous, but yet again she doesn’t get a whole lot to do. She’s mysterious, but in terms of agency she really has none. She’s a slave to the cards, until she becomes a slave to love (or at least lust!). It’s also somewhat problematic that we have the virginal white woman held in the power of malevolent black men. Maybe it would have been better, as was originally considered, if Solitaire had been black as well (though she is white in the book).

Of course does get a black love interest in Gloria Hendry’s Rosie Carver, sadly she’s not one of the better Bond girls. As Bond’s allies we get Lon Satton as the poor unfortunate Agent Strutter, and Roy Stewart as Quarrel Jr. A nice call-back to Dr No. Thankfully Quarrel Jr. survives! Hurrah.

David Hedison is Felix, and it’s kinda ironic him giving Bond shark advice given what’ll happen to him in Licence to Kill! Still, he’s always been one of my favourite Felixs, and other than Jeffrey Wright the only Felix to be in more than one film.

Finally there is Clifton James as Sherriff J.W. Pepper as well. Again a divisive character, but for me he’s a lot of fun, and utters some memorable lines (“What are you, some kind of doomsday machine?”) He probably shouldn’t have shown up in The Man with the Golden Gun though.

After some substandard action fare in Diamonds, there’s some great set pieces here. The bus chase is fun, and the crocodile leap is inspired. The Louisiana speedboat chase is nicely shot, and comes to a neat conclusion. Bond hand gliding to Solitaire’s mansion is great, and Bond infiltrating the voodoo ceremony is just fantastic. Bond’s final fight with Tee Hee is good too.

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It’s not perfect, the Bond-less pre-title sequence is a bit of a chore (but have we ever met the villain and the girl before Bond before?) but I guess they didn’t want to ape the intro of George. The plane chase with Mrs Bell is a trifle silly, and Bond’s method of killing Kananga does a disservice to that character (and is surprisingly bloodless).

Also, just who is it that tips Bond off that Rosie is a wrong-un by slipping him the Queen of Cups? It doesn’t make a lot of sense.

A final word on the music. Paul McCartney and Wings’ title track is easily one of the top five in the franchise, and much as I adore John Barry, George Martin’s score here is wonderful and perfect for this film.

One of my favourite films in the franchise and probably tied for Roger’s best Bond flick all round (I’ll let you know if a couple of films time)

Anyway, James Bond will return, with an extra nipple…

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Diamonds are Forever (1971)

Posted: July 23, 2019 in James Bond
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Connery is back!

And to celebrate he beats up some stereotypical foreigners and throttles a woman in the pre title sequence.

Bond hits the 70s, and the producers move heaven and earth to bring back Connery, which proves something of a mistake. They don’t quite seem to know what to do with him, and Sean can’t be bothered to try and inject any kind of menace into the performance. This Bond is barely recognisable as the man who fought Red Grant. It doesn’t help that Connery is older and, with the best will in the world, slightly less lean than he once was. Less a caged tiger, 007 has become a toothless old circus lion fooling around with clowns.

Which isn’t to say Connery, or the film, don’t have their moments, but they’re few and far between and sandwiched between some incredibly dull set pieces.

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The pre-title sequence is clearly supposed to show Bond getting revenge for the death of Tracy, but it falls flat, in part because this is a different Bond and a different Blofeld, and in part because there’s no sense of threat. Connery’s camp hand gestures don’t help, and while Grey is wonderfully effete later on, here it’s just very obvious that this isn’t the hard-edged git who killed Tracy (well, technically the getaway driver of course).

Once we get into the film proper, those warning signs from the first section grow louder. I happen to like Mr Wint and Mr Kidd, they’re amusingly lethal (except when it comes to 007 who they go to Dr Evil lengths to avoid killing at one point) but they’re also exceedingly camp. Watching them murder their way through the diamond route is surprisingly good fun though (fun fact, Bruce Glover is Crispin Glover’s dad, which technically makes Mr Wint Marty McFly’s granddad, kinda)

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Bond really is a smug git, and Lee has some lovely facial expressions here, you almost imagine M might be quite happy if someone offed his most insufferable agent.

There’s a nice Moneypenny scene—in uniform again, and apparently she and Connery filmed their bits separately—as Bond takes the place of diamond smuggler Peter Franks. I liked this bit, it’s always good to see 007 go undercover and do some actual spying, and he’s back to being a policeman again it seems.

In Amsterdam he meets Tiffany Case who, for some reason keeps changing her hair. Bond is of course a perfect gentleman (not) and the collars and cuffs line is a trifle cringeworthy.

All’s going well until Peter Franks escapes and makes it to Holland. Cue a decent fight in a lift, after we’ve seen Connery snogging himself outside, and after a rare example of Sean doing an accent. “Who is your floor?”

Sadly the fight’s undercut somewhat by Bond slipping his wallet into Franks’ pocket for Tiffany to find. Not only do we discover Bond has his own Playboy card, but it seems Tiffany has heard of Bond, in fact she makes it sound like everyone’s heard of Bond—though clearly nobody’s seen him! It’s a terrible moment for a spy, and marks the beginning of the “Your reputation precedes you, Mr Bond” era.

Then it’s off to Vegas and the camp goes through the roof. There’s an argument that Bond always feels slightly out of place in the States, and never more so than in Vegas. I love Vegas, but it’s brash and colourful and obvious, everything 007 shouldn’t be, and the gangsters here seem like a throwback to the fifties and sixties. Gotta love an undertaker named Slumber though.

After a brief dalliance with Plenty O’Toole, Bond finally seduces Tiffany; or is it the other way around? After Plenty is mistaken for Tiffany and killed (in a scene that doesn’t make any sense without the deleted scene where she nabs Tiffany’s address) Ms Case decides to nominally join the side of the angels.

Fun fact, the clown balloon game Tiffany plays in Circus Circus? I’ve done that!

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“Who’s he, your mother?”

Bond finally discovers the diamonds are being used by Dr Metz to build a satellite at a remote research facility owned by mysterious billionaire Willard Whyte. And then we get two of the dullest car chases in the franchise. I’m not sure why they’re faking a moon landing there, nor am I sure why the astronauts stay in character and move in slow motion even as 007 nicks their moon buggy, but the resultant chase is yawn inducing, and soon afterwards we get a bland car chase through Vegas, which even the two wheel stunt or a proto JW Pepper can’t save.

maxresdefaultThankfully Bond’s infiltration of Whyte’s penthouse is wonderfully done, cool, nerve-wracking and very James Bond, and his confrontation with two Blofelds is nicely done too, and whilst his plan doesn’t pay off, his trick to try and ID the real Blofeld is smart thinking.

Why the hell don’t Wint and Kidd just kill him when they get the chance though?

Bond rescues the real Willard Whyte, after first reinforcing the patriarchy by nearly drowning Bambie and Thumper, but he’s too late to stop Blofeld launching a rocket, and before you can say “One million dollars” Blofeld has a laser armed satellite in orbit that he’s planning to sell to the highest bidder, though to paraphrase Number 2 in Austin Powers, why didn’t he just content himself with Whyte’s billions is anyone’s guess.

As diabolical lairs go, an oil rig is a trifle banal, and whilst a more exciting finale was planned, what we actually get is, well again a bit dull, and Bond’s plan to swap a marching band tape for Blofeld’s master control tape is about as half arsed as you can get.

Still at least Bond finally gets revenge for Tracy by, er, making Blofeld seasick or something.

I do quite like Bond’s final, and fatal, battle with Mr Wint and Mr Kidd, though the films ends as it began by being as camp as a row of tents.

Really this is a Moore era Bond film that just happens to feature Connery, and whilst Connery tries to lighten his performance, you can’t escape the conclusion that he’s a man who isn’t right for this film. He’s not the animalistic Bond he once was, yet isn’t charming enough to pull off a lighter Bond the way Moore will.

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As Tiffany Case, St John starts well, but it’s all down hill from there. Initially she’s a cool and sassy professional, more than happy to change sides if it’ll keep her out of jail, but by the end she’s a squealing bimbo who seems to have lost half her IQ—the scene with the submachine gun is just terrible. It’s a shame. Jill St John was gorgeous and could have been a great Bond girl.

With Grey we get our third Blofeld in a row, and is it even the same man? Forget his appearance, his entire attitude has changed, and it is mildly amusing when he exclaims that science was never his strong suit, given in the last film he was running a bioweapons laboratory. Fair dues though, he’s the only Blofeld who could pull off a dress, and probably the perfect Ernst Stavro for this film.

The soundtracks good of course, and its always nice to see Q in the field, not sure he should really be running a heist in the casino, however.

Bringing back Connery no coubt kept the franchise ticking over I guess, but this is a new era for 007, and to be successful in the 1970s you really need something…Moore…

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And so we come to the final Bond film of the 60s, and a somewhat unique beast given its atypical length (until Casino Royale this was the longest Bond film by far) unconventional structure (certainly in comparison to most of the franchise) and of course, most notably, the fact that it’s the one and only time George Lazenby straps on the Walther PPK.

If I’m asked to name my favourite Bond film, OHMSS tends to trip automatically off my tongue, but it had been a few years since I’d seen it so, as with each film in this re-watch, I did have a little trepidation going in, would it live up to my lofty expectations, or would it appear I’ve been labouring under a false belief all these years.

Let’s cut to the chase, I bloody love it!

It really is a top-drawer film, a proper film in so many ways, and it’s interesting to compare it to the mishmash that was You Only Live Twice. The script here is far stronger, which helps enormously, and by all accounts this is the Bond flick that adheres most directly to the book (which I really must read again). Peter Hunt’s direction also helps. One can’t help feeling that he’s choosing to direct a film, not a Bond film, and I wonder if the franchise could do with trying that again some time.

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Given it’s his one and only film, let’s talk Lazenby. Old George gets a rough time from critics, he’s wooden, he can’t act, he’s a joke. In all honestly Lazenby could be considered one of the weakest elements of the film, yet also, conversely, maybe it’s strongest asset. In the end however good Rigg is (and we’ll come onto Dame Diana shortly) this film succeeds because of that final scene, and the fact that George sells it in a way many another Bond actor might not have. It’s even more evident after so recently watching YOLT, but just imagine Connery in that final scene. I shudder at the very thought. It’d be like Austin Powers at the start of The Spy who Shagged Me “Way hey, I’m single again!”.

Lazenby won’t ever win a best Bond contest, but he was the perfect Bond for the perfect Bond film. His inexperience and vulnerability make this film work, and sure, he wouldn’t have been half as good in something like Goldfinger, but in OHMSS he’s spot on, and I really wish he’d done one more film, and that the producers had decided to focus on Bond getting revenge rather than the half hearted attempt Connery makes during Diamond’s pre title sequence (but I’m getting ahead of myself.)

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I do love a happy ending…

Lazenby certainly has the look, and it’s amazing to consider he was just 28 when this was made! And really I don’t think he’s that terrible an actor all things considered, and he potentially could have grown into the role. He has the physicality, and convinces in the action scenes, but also the romantic ones. He and Diana Rigg may or may not have hated each other during filming, but onscreen at least they effortlessly play the part of two people madly in love, and however much Diana may have been carrying George at time in those scenes, it really does take two to tango, so I think he deserves some credit.

Yes his delivery of some lines is a little ropey, and he doesn’t have the witty delivery of Connery (or Moore or Brosnan) but he arguably gives one of the greatest bits of the franchise when he’s cradling Tracy’s head in his lap.

tracy3So let’s talk Tracy. Oh my, if OHMSS is my default fave Bond film, then Diana Rigg is my default fave Bond girl, and let’s be clear here, she more as likely always will be. Beautiful and determined, ethereal yet steely, Diana Rigg is nothing short of magnificent, and after all the, let’s be honest, insipid Bond girls we’ve had up to now (excepting Fiona Volpe of course) Tracy is a breath of fresh air. This is a character with true agency, a damaged soul who, lest we forget, when we first meet is trying to kill herself. She’s a risk taker, a woman who, as her father says, has burned the life out of herself by living too fast. This is a woman who gambles with money she doesn’t have and then pays her debt in Bond’s bed, which is her decision, unlike certain other 007’s Lazenby does give her the option of not paying her debt in this fashion. Yes, you could argue she’s a damsel in distress who needs Bond to save her, but I think that’s a flawed assertion. What rises Tracy way above the average is that she chooses to let Bond save her. He doesn’t just rescue her, she lets him rescue her.

And of course she’s quite capable of looking after herself, she skis as well as Bond, drives as well as Bond, and is pretty handy in a fight as well, just see how she despatches Gunther late on—and interesting to note that the Bond theme that started playing when the attack on Piz Gloria began, cuts out just as she kills him, almost like she was 007 (now there’s a thought to rile an awful lot of fans!)

She’s also quite capable of turning on the charm, and the scene where she quotes James Elroy Flecker to beguile Blofeld is so joyous I think I could watch it on a loop all day.

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“Who loves ya baby!”

Ah, Blofeld. Savalas is an interesting choice, the very antithesis of Pleasance, and not remotely like Charles Grey who’ll be up next, but if he perhaps isn’t an urbane foe, he does at least make for an intimidating one. You can’t imagine Donald Pleasance or Grey in a bobsleigh after all. He’s not the best Blofeld, but he might well be the most dangerous. His grand scheme is bonkers, and it’s nice that even he acknowledges that his price is ridiculous!

As Tracy’s father Draco Gabriele Ferzetti has the kind of easy charm that places Draco on a par with Kerim Bey or Tiger.

Ilse Steppat is wonderful as Irma Bunt, albeit there are shades of Rosa Kleb to the character. I hadn’t realised that she sadly died just a few days after the film’s release. She was only 52.

Tragedy would also befall another cast member, albeit later in life. I won’t go into Angela Scoular’s demise here, but I will say that Ruby Bartlett was a joy, can you imagine a Lancashire gal like that turning up in a Bond film these days?

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This certainly never happened to the other fella!

There are some other famous faces in amongst Blofeld’s angels of death of course. Catherine Schell would go on to play Maya in Space 1999, and before eventually winding up as Patsy in Ab Fab,  Joanna Lumley would of course follow in Diana Rigg’s boots by being in the (New) Avengers.

The recurring characters get a few nice moments, in particular Lois Maxwell plays nicely against Lazenby, and there’s a nice moment between her and M (such a shame Maxwell didn’t get the job as M, imagine that dynamic when Bond came in for his assignment!) Q’s wedding day advice to Bond is quite amusing as well.

The action scenes are top notch here, although you do have to wait a while, 007 doesn’t kill anyone until we’re 90 minutes in. This gives the film room to breath of course, and allows for the courtship of Bond and Tracy, Casino Royale will attempt the same thing, only slightly less successfully as it will be squeezed in near the end.

Eventually we get ski chases, and car chases, helicopter attacks and Lazenby sliding along the curling track firing a submachine gun, and we get that bobsleigh chase as well. Not to mention Bond’s escape from the cable car control room is quite hairy as well.

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Bond also gets to do some actual spying, breaking into Gumbold’s office and his safe before making off with his copy of playboy, and then going under cover as Sir Hilary Bray.

And okay, here’s where we get one of the film’s several contrivances. Why doesn’t Blofeld recognise James?  I mean they have met, that both men look different doesn’t negate the fact that technically they’re the same men they were in YOLT. Maybe 007’s had plastic surgery (an idea that didn’t make the final script) maybe Blofeld banged his head when he was escaping that exploding volcano or maybe, like Lois Lane, Ernst Stavro is easily fooled by a pair of glasses?

In the end it doesn’t spoil the film one iota, and nor does the convenience of Bond happening to bump into Tracy at the ice rink.

I’ve said this is my favourite film, and features my favourite Bond girl, but it also features my favourite Bond tune. No, not We have all the time in the world, though Louis Armstrong’s song is a doozy. I’m referring to John Barry’s instrumental. A wonderfully evocative and exciting track that still gets my heart pumping to this day, and yes I even like it better than the James Bond theme!

You can quibble about the producer’s decision to hark back to the previous films all day—scenes from the past films play over the titles, when Bond is considering resigning his draw is full of all manner of props from other films (though how he got Honey’s knife off her I’ll never know) and we even get a man whistling Goldfinger as he cleans Draco’s office—and you can be annoyed at Bond breaking the fourth wall for the one and only time, but I really don’t care, and Bond’s “This never happened to the other fellow,” like the title track, never fails to make me smile.

A Bond film like no other, with a Bond girl like no other and, most importantly of all, an ending that knocks the stuffing out of you, OHMSS really is magnificent.

Now on to the seventies and the return of a familiar face…

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You Only Live Twice (1967)

Posted: May 21, 2019 in James Bond
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“You can watch it all on TV, every Bank Holiday Monday.”

So here we are with the penultimate (official) Connery Bond film. It’s been two years since Thunderball, and SPECTRE have graduated from stealing nuclear bombs to stealing entire spaceships as they plot to create war between the USA and the Soviet Union. Luckily the British believe someone else is to blame, and suspect that someone is in Japan. After faking 007’s death to give him room to manoeuvre, Bond’s despatched to Japan, a country where men come first, and a film Mike Myers got far too many jokes out of…

There was a time when, if asked about my favourite Connery film, I might actually have said this one. In hindsight I can see why; hollowed out volcanos, a great Blofeld, Little Nellie, spaceships! It’s just that watching it now its flaws are all too clear. Which doesn’t mean it isn’t an enjoyable Bond film, it just means it’s one you’re better off not thinking about in too much detail.

Really it’s the plotting that lets it down. Let’s set aside for a moment the notion that somehow war between America and the Soviets would leave China and the rest of the world untouched, set aside how rockets can take off without anyone noticing, especially given that Bond seems to be in the vicinity around the time of one launch. The big question is, why go to the trouble of building a spaceship that eats other spaceships, why not just blow the other craft up? It’s not like anyone is going up there to search for clues.

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There are other annoyances, why for instance does Helga Brandt, who let’s not forget has Bond tied up and at her mercy, release him, just so they can then get in a plane that she can bail out of to leave him to die? It makes zero sense. It isn’t like they’re that worried about linking Bond with Osato Industries. I mean, a car full of goons tries to perforate 007 immediately after he walks out of the company’s headquarters. Couldn’t they at least wait for him to walk around the corner?

It feels almost blasphemous to say this, but the blame must surely lie with the screenwriter, the late, great Roald Dahl.

nellieGaping plot holes wider than the mouth of a volcano aside, there are some great set pieces here. Bond’s ‘death’ and funeral are great, as is his meeting with M aboard the submarine. It’s great to see Bond in navel uniform (and special mention to how gorgeous Lois Maxwell looks in uniform too). Bond’s fight atop the buildings of Kobe docks is wonderfully staged, and shot, especially the aerial filming. It does seem like following on from Thunderball being the film with all the scuba divers, You Only Live Twice is the film with all the helicopters! From Tanaka’s magnet carrying chopper (mad but fun) to Little Nellie and Bond’s dogfight with four bigshots, and then there’s the helicopter heading in and out of the volcano. Throw in the aerial filming and the producers must have got a job lot!

Let’s talk more about the dogfight. Little Nellie is wonderful, and it’s nice to see Bond return a vehicle in one piece (mostly) for once. By modern standards it might be a bit static, but I still love it.

And no discussion of set pieces would be complete without mention of Tanaka’s ninja attack! The modern Bond films seem to have dispensed with the small war finale, which is a shame, and this one is a doozy, made all the better by the set Ken Adam and his team put together. No CGI back then so that’s a hell of a set!

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Cast wise You Only Live Twice does well in some departments, and poorly in others. Pleasence is wonderful as Blofeld (and for me still the definitive Ernst Stavro) but his reveal is late on in the film, shame we didn’t get more of him. Still it is delicious when he tells the Chinese agent who accuses him is extortion that “Extortion is my business.” I mean seriously guys, it’s the E in the organisation’s name! As an aside on SPECTRE working practices, yet again people don’t get much of a warning, straight to the piranha tank for you, Miss Brandt!

As Tiger, Tetsurō Tamba is great, recalling Kerim Bey in From Russia with Love.

176On the Bond girl front things aren’t so strong. Akiko Wakabayashi as Aki is good (and I love the way she refers to Bond as Zero-Zero) aside from the fact that she curiously throws herself at Bond with no preamble, it’s like we were missing some scenes that suggested more of a connection between them. Still, she’s capable and her acting isn’t bad. Shame she gets murdered. Double shame that Connery can’t be arsed to get that cut up about it. I’m so glad he isn’t around for the next film.

Aki’s replacement as Bond girl is Mie Hama as Kissy Suzuki (yes that’s her name!) who’s something of a wet fish if you ask me, not that she’s given much to work with. That leaves Karin Dor as Brandt. It’s clear what the producers were going for; if a villainous European redhead had proven so successful last time out, why reinvent the wheel. Oh dear. Dor does her best, but sadly Brandt isn’t a patch on Fiona Volpe.

And then there’s Connery. You can tell he’s fed up by now, he just doesn’t seem to be putting the effort in, though he isn’t helped by the script. Expressing practically no emotion at the death of Aki is unforgivable though. I’m not suggesting he break down in floods of tears, but he barely waits a minute before talking to Tiger about his upcoming wedding!

Ah the wedding, which brings us (not so) neatly onto a discussion of sexism and racism. Women don’t get treated especially well here, and did Tiger really just refer to a woman as sexiful? On the plus side Bond doesn’t lie on top of anyone till she gives in or blackmails anyone into sex so maybe that’s an improvement.

Culturally in many ways the film isn’t as bad as you might imagine. The wedding, and Sumo scenes are both treated with some semblance of respect, and on the whole Japan isn’t viewed as being backward and Tiger and his people are portrayed as smart and competent. It’s just shame that we then get Bond’s transformation into a Japanese man, which is about as convincing as Gary Johnston’s transformation into an Arab in Team America. Bond looks less like a Japanese fisherman than a guy off to infiltrate the Romulan Empire, he just needs pointed ears.

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John Barry’s score is great, mixing western and eastern themes, though Nancy Sinatra’s title track is a tad forgettable. The space effects are nicely done and still hold up today, and kudos for perhaps one of the grisliest deaths in the franchise as an astronaut is left to die alone in orbit; shudder. Talking of astronauts, I wonder what did happen to those two cosmonauts and the other American astronaut? Also what was Bond going to do if he had been able to get into the rocket? You get the feeling he hadn’t thought this through. Oh well, guess some other 007 will have to be the first (and only) Bond in space!

On the ‘not them again front’, Burt Kwok is back, and spot Ed Straker and Scott Tracy (Ed Bishop and the recently departed Shane Rimmer, both of whom turned up in multiple Bond films) and if you look closely one of the Russian mission control guys is a certain German Colonel from Allo Allo.

Perhaps the best WTF is this though. Remember the girl who promises Bond a very special duck in the pre title sequence, well the actress, Tsai Chin, is one of the poker players in Casino Royale!

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There’s a lot to enjoy in YOLT, but more care should have been taken with the story. YOLT seems a curious book to try and adapt given it follows on directly from On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (apparently OHMSS was planed to be the next film after Thunderball but they had trouble finding a snowy setting so decided to squeeze another one in first. As I’ve already said, I’m glad about this because I firmly believe a Connery version of OHMSS would have been nowhere near as affecting as the one we’ve got.)

Still, Bond in uniform, Little Nellie, the focus on Japan, Blofeld’s reveal, space rockets, and did I mention a fricken hollowed out volcano? This is fun, it’s just not a great film in the Bond pantheon.

Anyway James Bond will return, but he might look a trifle different…

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Thunderball (1965)

Posted: May 3, 2019 in James Bond
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And we’re onto the fourth Bond film, hurrah! I possibly need to pick the pace up a little, still although a lot has been announced about Bond #25, it still doesn’t have a title, so I figure I still have quite a bit of time!

Maybe I was a bit lax because I wasn’t looking forward to this one. Oh, sure, there was a time when I loved it (a long time ago) but the last couple of times I’d seen it I remember being underwhelmed. So, has my opinion changed?

Irritatingly, yes and no. There’s actually a lot to like here, and yet the whole never quite lives up to the sum of its parts for some reason.

SPECTRE steal two nuclear bombs and threaten to blow up a British or American city unless the UK government pay £100 million (note to Mike Myers, see that joke really wasn’t even funny now was it? Because even in 1965 Dr Evil would have asked for more than one million dollars.) All 00 agents are assigned to find the bombs and Bond deftly avoids a posting to Canada (seriously, M?) by suggesting his time might be better spent chasing young women in the Bahamas, and as crazy as it sounds, he’s actually right!

After a drab pre title sequence when Bond punches out a man dressed as a woman (yes, ok Myers you can have that one) the film picks up the pace. It’s always nice to see 007 doing some detective work, and whilst recuperating at a health spa he becomes rightly suspicious of Count Lippe and a mysteriously bandaged patient. Sure, Bond’s investigations are a tad clunky, and I don’t think either he or Lippe do well in the undercover stakes, but it is always nice to see 007 using his brains.

The theft of the atom bombs is superb, from the reveal that poor old Major Derval has been copied, to Angelo’s takeover and crash landing of the plane underwater, closely followed by Angelo paying the price for being a greedy so and so, in a scene that still gives me the shivers.

And what’s 007 doing while the Vulcan’s being nicked? Oh, just blackmailing a woman into sex by threatening to get her the sack, you know, the usual…ok, you could argue that Patricia just assumes he could get her the sack, but it isn’t like James disabuses her of this notion. Minus marks, 007, must try harder.

largo_gunHaving seen the dead Derval, Bond’s lead is his sister Domino who’s the mistress (any pretence of ward is quickly dispensed with) of Emilio Largo, a man with an eyepatch and a liking for white dinner jackets who’s also known as Number 2 in SPECTRE (ok Myers, but this really is the last one!). Adolfo Celi is a forceful and sadistic presence, very different from Goldfinger, even if his eyepatch screams villain. He’s dubbed (as actors so often were in these early Bond films) because although his English was very good, his accent was, apparently a trifle thick.

As Domino, Claudine Auger is a so-so Bond girl, pretty but somewhat vapid for the most part, although fair play, she does get a bit of agency in the end by being the one to off Largo, but not a great Bond girl.

Unlike the film’s femme fatale. As Fiona Volpe, Luciana Paluzzi is amazing. Gorgeous, vicious, smart, ruthless, commanding and with a swagger many male villains would give their prosthetic claws for. From killing Count Lippe (seriously, does no one in SPECTRE ever just get a warning? See the guy electrocuted in his chair earlier) to literally driving Bond to distraction, she has agency in abundance, and for perhaps the first time a woman calls 007 out on the preposterousness of his reputation. “Bond, James Bond, who only has to make love to a woman and she starts to hear heavenly choirs singing.” Not that Fiona switches sides after a shag, no siree, this girl, this woman, is not for turning, and whether that quote is a sly did at Pussy or not, arguably Fiona Volpe is the best Bond girl so far. Even if she does end up dying in 007’s arms.

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Bond has a fair few gadgets here, even if many of them are shoehorned into the pre-title sequence. The jet pack probably looked amazing at the time but now seems ridiculous, though it’s nice to see the tricked out DB5 getting another airing. Other than this Bond’s got a mini rebreather which comes in handy more than once (a pleasant rarity for a Bond film), a Geiger counter in a watch and a camera, an underwater jet pack and a tracking device he has to swallow. It’s always fun to see Q out in the field and here’s the first occurrence. We get our third Felix into the bargain as well, though I quite like Rik Van Nutter’s dishevelled take on the role, and he at least looks more like Jack Lord than the last guy!

tb-beach-pink1-e1426555103685Let’s talk Connery though, is it me or does he seem to be phoning it in a little more? Maybe not all the time, but he definitely doesn’t quite have the presence he’s had before, though there are some nice scenes, and his “Wait till you see my teeth” line is wonderfully delivered. I suppose we can’t blame him for getting a trifle tired of the role, this was his fourth Bond film in as many years (remember that Daniel Craig will end up with a six-year break between films!) At least he’ll get a bit of a breather before the next film in the series.

As stated, the theft of the Vulcan is fantastic, and the 00 briefing scene is wonderfully staged as well, as is Bond hiding out in the carnival. So why does Thunderball leave me a little cold?

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Maybe it’s the action scenes, most specifically the underwater action scenes. Don’t get me wrong, I can tell this was a big deal back in 1965, and the underwater filming is clearly impressive, except it feels like the producers thought it was so impressive that we needed to see as much of it as possible! Connery seems to spend a third of the film underwater, and whilst the final underwater battle starts well, it doesn’t half go on a bit. Really, once you’ve seen one guy get harpooned underwater you’ve seen them all, and the fact they’re underwater ensures everyone seems to be moving slowly, all of which combines to turn what should be a tense and exciting battle into something that just drags.

Perhaps to compensate, once Bond and Largo are fighting it out on the boat, the camera is speeded up, presumably to add to the tension, though it just seems plain silly. The pick up via sky hook equipped plane s a wonderfully surreal final shot however (and it’s a real thing).

On a final note it’s interesting that we get Tom Jones singing Thunderball rather than Shirley Bassey’s Mr Kiss Kiss Bang Bang when the producers baulked at not having the title of the film in the song lyrics. Quick fun fact, Jones supposedly held that final note so long he fainted!

One last fun fact, Martine Beswick makes her second appearance in a Bond film having been one of the gypsy gals in From Russia With Love.

Do I hate Thunderball? No, because there’s much to like here, notably the Vulcan scenes and every second Fiona Volpe’s on screen, and in small doses the underwater stuff is genuinely impressive, I just can’t help feeling this is a film that could have easily lost five or ten minutes in the editing room and been better for it. Decent enough but probably the weakest in the franchise so far.

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Goldfinger (1964)

Posted: April 5, 2019 in James Bond
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And so we’re onto the third Bond film. Worth noting that back then they made three of them in less time than there’s currently been between Spectre and Bond #25…

But I digress. Time for 007 to take on a simple smuggling case that turns out to involve plans for the worlds greatest bank robbery, well, maybe not a robbery…

Ask a cross section of Bond fans, be they rabid or occasional, to name their top three Bond films and chances are Goldfinger will probably feature in a large number of rankings. To this day it’s an iconic film, the epitome of the franchise, but is it actually any good?

To be honest it’d been a few years since I’d seen it in its entirety, and I’d got it into my head that it was a film that wasn’t nearly as good as its reputation suggested.

How wrong can a guy be?

Sure it has a few creaky moments, and one altogether distasteful element, but I’ll get onto that. For now let’s just say that it is iconic, a film that laid the groundwork of much that was to follow, and however good Dr No and From Russia With Love were, this is the film that cemented Bond as a powerhouse, and it introduced elements that resonate to this day.

In many ways it’s the very antithesis of FRWL, sure we’re not in the realms of hollowed out volcanos just yet, but Goldfinger isn’t remotely the gritty spy thriller FRWL was, it’s more fantastical then what came before, but a tad more grounded than what might follow.

Goldfinger’s pre-title sequence is a doozy, and it set the bar really high in terms of a miniature movie in its own right. Bond infiltrates a secret base, blows it up, gets the girl, gets betrayed by the girl, kills an assassin and even has time for a pithy one liner, all in less time that it took Daniel Craig to walk to a hotel in the pre title sequence of Spectre. That Connery plays it with effortless cool is the icing on the cake. Frankly there are possibly whole Bond films less exciting than Goldfinger’s pre-title sequence is.

Not that what follows is dull, although you might be forgiven for remembering the film being more action packed than it is, and pacing wise there’s nothing formulaic about this Bond film, for starters 007 spends pretty much half the film as Goldfinger’s prisoner, which I’m pretty sure isn’t something we’ve seen since (though rumours suggest Bond #25 may try and emulate this.)

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“Make Gold Great Again!”

Ah, Auric Goldfinger, the titular villain is larger than life in every sense of the word. In many ways  something of a buffoon, a cheating blowhard in love with the sound of his own voice, and once you throw the love of gold and golf into the equation it’s disturbing how reminiscent he is of a certain American President. And yet, despite this, he’s also quite clearly very dangerous, and not a fool either, and whilst you can credit Michael Collin’s dubbing for part of the appeal, it’s  Gert Fröbe’s physicality and mannerisms that really sell the character. He also has a natty line in bestowing imaginative ends on his enemies. See poor Mr Solo (nice little Bond-Fleming-Man from U.N.C.L.E in-joke there) crushed in the scrapyard, or one of the most iconic deaths meted out in the entire franchise, when Shirley Eaton’s poor Jill Masterson pays the price for betraying Goldfinger by winding up suffocated under a coat of gold paint. Whether that would actually kill you hardly matters, the image was seared into history, to such an extend that the producers tried, with far less success, to emulate it in 2008 by covering Gemma Arterton in oil. And of course, Jill’s sister, Tilly meets a grisly end courtesy of Odd Job’s steel rimmed hat (sad that Tania Mallet died just a few days ago).

And whilst Goldfinger doesn’t actually kill James, he comes pretty close, and his method has a delicious irony to it. Let’s be honest, Connery strapped to a metal bed as a laser beam creeps ever closer to his family jewels is almost as memorable as poor Jill’s golden death. Much like when he was facing certain death in FRWL Connery sweats fear, again he’s desperate, trying anything he can to escape. Goldfinger isn’t interested, and as exchanges go there’s few better in the franchise than “Do you expect me to talk?” “No, Mr Bond, I expect you to die.”

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But then Bond wriggles his way out of ending up a Damien Hirst sculpture by mentioning Operation Grand Slam. Goldfinger, correctly, intuits that Bond merely overheard the phrase and has no idea what it means, but can he afford to take the chance? The Chinese agent working with Goldfinger (and yes that is Burt Kwouk) clearly feels they need to keep him alive. Yes, it might seem ridiculous that Goldfinger chooses not to kill Bond, but watching the film again it’s clearly a shrewd move. With Bond still very much alive, 008 won’t be despatched to investigate, especially with Felix Leiter (three films in and onto our second Felix) foolishly believing Bond has everything under control, in reality it’s Goldfinger who has the situation firmly under control, or at least he thinks he does.

He hasn’t counted on 007’s sheer animal magnetism however…oh dear.

Let’s talk about Pussy.

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In so many ways Honor Blackman’s Pussy Galore is the best Bond girl to date, and unless memory really doesn’t serve me well, will remain so until another star of the Avengers arrives on the scene in 1969 (but I’m getting ahead of myself).

You could argue she isn’t as drop dead beautiful as Andress or Bianchi, but she’s still gorgeous and, more importantly, she has presence, she can act, and the character has agency, well, up to a point. Pussy is Goldfinger’s trusted ally, a woman who’s formed her own flying circus composed entirely of sexy women pilots (you don’t think she might prefer women to blokes do you?) she’s also got no time for 007’s bullshit.

Until she does.

Whilst it isn’t as explicit as it may be in the book that Pussy is a lesbian, it’s clearly inferred. Even if she isn’t gay, Bond effectively forcing himself on her is distasteful enough, that his seduction “straightens” her out just makes things so much worse, and it’s a shame that this has to serve as the reason she betrays Goldfinger, rather than Bond appealing to her better nature. There’s a certain amount of misogyny I can tolerate in the franchise, this moment crosses the line.

For whatever reason, Pussy betrays Goldfinger (cats are notoriously fickle) and his plan to irradiate all the gold in Fort Knox comes unglued.

It’s interesting to note how uninvolved Bond is in all of this, he isn’t even able to defuse the atomic bomb in the end, he has to rely on one of Felix’s men. He does get revenge for both Jill and Tilly however, by killing Oddjob.

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I take my hat off you you, sir

Ah, Oddjob, another high flyer in the pantheon of henchmen. Weightlifter come wrestler Harold Sakata might be near mute, but he’s a powerful presence, with an unmistakable silhouette—in fact the first time we see him it’s only his shadow—and whether he’s throwing his deadly hat, or crushing golf balls with his bare hands, he’s a dangerous foe, at least until 007 electrocutes him; not so fun fact, Sakata burned his hand during that scene, yet refused to let go, what a pro.

We’re in less exotic climes this time, with much of the film taking place in England and Kentucky, with a stop off in scenic Switzerland, and at times there’s a leisurely pace to the film, and not in a bad way. Can you imagine a modern Bond film spending so long on a game of golf? Can you imagine a modern Bond even playing golf?

Ken Adams outdoes himself yet again with the set design, be it Goldfinger’s Kentuckian lair, or Fort Knox itself, and whilst the franchise dallied with gadgets in the last film, here we get a clear sign of what’s to come with the tricked out Aston Martin DB5; machine guns, oil slicks, scythes, rotating number plates, oh and it also comes with an ejector seat. “You must be joking,” says Bond in Q’s lab.

Hah this is nothing, wait till we give you an invisible car…

One final fun fact before I hit my conclusion, the devious dancer in the pre-title sequence was also Kerim Bey’s mistress!

Goldfinger isn’t perfect, Bond is a little inert at times, and a few things don’t quite hang together (why would Goldfinger explain his plan to rob Fort Knox in so much detail to the Mafia guys when he’s about to murder them?) And of course, there’s the scene in the barn.

But despite its flaws it’s a rightfully iconic film that embodies pretty much everything about the franchise. A great pre-title sequence, a wonderful villain with an equally memorable henchman, a diabolical, and slightly left field, plot, the first Bond girl who’s more than two dimensional, a gadget laden Aston Martin, Sean Connery at the top of his game ( and he really is great in this) and I nearly forgot, one of the best damn title songs of them all sung by my dad’s favourite singer, Miss Shirley Bassey!

I know I’ve thrown the ‘I’ word around a lot, but damn it’s well earned here. A top-notch Bond film.

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From Russia With Love (1963)

Posted: March 15, 2019 in James Bond
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And so my epic re-watch of every Bond film, in order, reaches the dizzy heights of, er, the second film. It’s fine, I have all the time in the world…

Anyway, Bond’s off to Istanbul, not Constantinople, to see a girl about a cipher machine.

There is a common nostalgia amongst some fans for the halcyon days when Bond films were realistic, gritty thrillers, before all the more fantastical elements that clearly arrived with that Roger bloke. Anyone with even a passing understanding of the franchise knows this is something of a fallacy, some of Connery’s films are the most fantastical of all (hollowed-out volcano anyone, a madman with metal hands and his own nuclear reactor?). That being said, of course some Bond films are gritty, and precious few are as grounded as From Russia with Love.

Yes, there’s an evil genius with a nefarious plan, but as diabolical schemes go it’s relatively tame. He doesn’t want to blow up Fort Knox, or start World War 3, he just wants to steal a Russian cipher machine so he can sell it back to the Soviets, oh and maybe get revenge for Dr No into the bargain by killing 007.

In many ways FRWL is the direct opposite of Dr No, there the titular villain doesn’t show up until near the end, whereas here we meet a whole host of characters before we see James Bond. Okay, Connery’s in the pre title sequence, but he isn’t Bond, it’s a feint, our boy doesn’t actually rock up for real until over fifteen minutes into the film, by which time we’ve met Red Grant, Kronsteen, Rosa Klebb, Blofeld, Blofeld’s cat, and even Tatiana! Off the top of my head the only other Bond films that come close are Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun, but in neither case do we wait so long for 007.

Not that we’re bored without him, from Kronsteen’s gloriously staged chess game, to the violent delights of SPECTRE island and Klebb’s creepy recruitment of Tatiana, there’s plenty going on. If anything the pace of the film slows dramatically after Bond finally appears.

I don’t have anything against slow burn films, quite the reverse at times, but it has to be said that at times FRWL feels a little too slow. Like Dr No this feels like a film in conflict with itself, at once yearning to break the mould, yet at the same time beholden to the good old days. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, and it hasn’t dated as badly as some Bonds will, but for me it isn’t quite the classic many claim it to be.

Which doesn’t mean it isn’t very, very good.

After exotic Jamaica, this time we’re heading for exotic Turkey, which gives the film a very different feel, and makes it feel like a Cold War thriller in a way Dr No never quite managed.

There’s interesting things at play right from the off, take Bond locating the bugs and forcing the hotel staff to move him to another room, initially this shows us Bond’s competence, but in actuallity he’s merely a pawn moving precisely as Kronsteen had predicted.

Not that 007 is some dupe, he and M are well aware this is a trap, it’s just a trap they’re willing to walk into in hopes of getting their hands on a Lektor (which it has to be said feels like a quaint McGuffin even in 1963). The only thing MI6 don’t realise is that the trap hasn’t been set by the Russians.

There’s some wonderful scenery in Istanbul, in particular the flooded catacombs Kerim Bey uses to spy on the Russians.

DI-From-Russia-With-Love-16Ah Kerim Bey, one of many of Bond allies but one who stands out more than most. There’s something a little disingenuous about getting a Mexican to play a Turk, but Pedro Armendáriz plays him so well that you hardly care. Bey arrives fully formed; noble, hedonistic, brave, intelligent, a man playing a great game in Turkey, they follow us, we follow them as his son tells Bond. Armendáriz injects so much life into the performance that it’s hard to get your head around the fact that he was terminally ill, and would kill himself before the film finished shooting.

He and Connery bounce well off each other, and again Connery is good. Manly yet playful, dangerous yet noble. For the second film in a row he expresses some distaste at violence meted out to women, though he show no compunction is meting it out himself (insert your own Connery commentary here) and when he threatens to leave Tatiana behind, you kinda think he might.

Again there’s nuance I didn’t expect to find, and a genuine sense of mortality. Just check out the look on Bond’s face as he finds himself on the wrong end of Red Grant’s gun. He imagines he’s going to die and is scrabbling around in desperation for any way to survive.

Two films in and my slight disdain in Connery’s Bond is wavering.

Of course it helps if you have a good adversary, and if Kerim Bey is an exemplary ally, then Red Grant is an exemplary villain, even if technically he’s a henchman.

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“You’ll never guess how much these shoes cose, Bond.”

If Connery moves like a tiger, then Grant is a cobra, a cold-blooded snake with only one thought in mind; his mission. Robert Shaw is amazing, marrying an imposing physique with raw menace and genuine acting talent, and however cold he might be, there’s a broiling rage behind those eyes, Grant has a chip on his shoulder, and though it isn’t as obvious here as in the book, Shaw imbues his performance with it. Grant detests Bond, and not just because he killed Dr No.

What’s most disturbing about Red Grant these days of course, is how much he looks like Daniel Craig!

As Rosa Klebb, Lotte Lenya is almost as iconic as Grant, a brutal, Machiavellian villain and one of the franchise’s finest she utterly convinces as a Russian officer turned Spectre #3, her natural aura of command never in doubt, even when surrounded by burley men on all sides. She even convinces as a meek cleaning lady, and you have to admire the way she eyes up both Grant and Tatiana.

f3wkOANYRwmzt8ATIl2hbRvF3hwAh Tatiana. Much like Ursula Andress Daniela Bianchi is incredibly beautiful, much like Andress she’s dubbed, and much like Honey Tatiana doesn’t get much to do except be manipulated or placed in peril. Yes, there’s a smidgen of agency at the end when she betrays Klebb, but it’s too little, far too late.

Vladek Sheybal is wonderfully arrogant as Kronsteen, and Lee and Maxwell are always reliable. We get Desmond Llewelyn’s first appearance as Q (though not explicitly named) and Eunice Grayson’s last as Sylvia Trench. Then there’s Walter Gotell as a Spectre agent, Gotell will go on to play General Gogol in several Moore films, and Dalton’s debut. As an interesting side note the body (if not the voice) of Blofeld belongs to Anthony Dawson, i.e. Professor Dent. Damn, this franchise is incestuous!

Now onto the gadgets. The fully stocked briefcase with its knife, gold coins and teargas bomb, is a nice prop, and manages to be both slightly ridiculous, yet also incredibly practical, and whilst woefully underpowered, Bond’s collapsible sniper rifle is cool too.

In terms of action it’s a mixed bag. It would be disingenuous to start with anything other than Connery and Shaw’s brawl in the train carriage. Even decades later it stands up as one of the best fights in the series, in part because its so brutal, with neither man willing to give any quarter, but the lead up shouldn’t be overlooked, the whole scene between Shaw and Connery is magnificent.

And it isn’t the only iconic brawl, kudos to Aliza Gur and Martine Beswick for their vicious gypsy wrestling match. The attack on the gypsy camp is well handled too, with Bond coolly striding through the mayhem despatching bad guys with ease, watched over by Grant’s angel of death.

Bond vs a Spectre helicopter is decent enough, but references North by Northwest a little too closely. I’d always believed Bond cribbing from other films was something that came later, but here they are, doing it in the second film; though if you’re going to crib from anyone it might as well be Hitchcock.

Sadly, the films becomes a bit of a slog at the end, with one set piece too many. The boat chase never really gets my blood pumping, it seems unnecessary and, frankly, a trifle slow. It also overshadows Klebb and Bond’s final confrontation; going straight from the helicopter chase to Venice might have been better.

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“You know this film isn’t half bad.”

The final scenes on the gondola are a trifle strange, and the less said about Bond’s curious wave the better, but little detracts from what is a film that’s more consistent than Dr No and remains one of the highlights of the series, and works just ss well as a chess game of a Cold War thriller as it does a Bond movie.